Yearly Archives: 2015

2015 Favourite facts

References 1. 29% of women in G20 say they have experienced harassment at work: 61% never report it! https://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/3632/New-global-poll-reveals-the-top-5-workplace-challenges-facing-G20-women.aspx The survey was carried out online by Ipsos Global @dvisor from 24 July– 7 August 2015 in the following 17 countries: Argentina, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Turkey, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Italy, Japan and…
CONTINUE READING

Kaleidoscopic Britain and triple tensions

Following the referendum in Scotland last year, 2015 saw an equally tumultuous general election which held a mirror up to Britain and social change. As the ‘father of psephology’ Sir David Butler wrote in the 1950s, “politics are peripheral to the lives of most people; they think and act in relation to their immediate environment…
CONTINUE READING

Exit Polls?

The chimes of Big Ben at 10pm on Thursday 7th May were followed by an exit poll heralding a Conservative victory that surprised politicians, commentators, forecasters and, of course, us pollsters (Ben Page discusses this more on p130). History and opinion polls alike had pointed to a ‘war of the weak’ where neither Labour nor…
CONTINUE READING

Understanding Generation Next

A quick Google search for images of Millennials comes up with groups of ethnically diverse, casually dressed young people hanging out and using smartphones. However, with the oldest of the Millennials (also known as Generation Y) turning 35 this year, perhaps images of bleary-eyed parents or proud home-owners would be relevant too. Millennials are the most…
CONTINUE READING

Learning to live with austerity

After five years of cuts in local government, policing and Whitehall, with plenty more to come, how are public perceptions holding up? They are shifting – but in a way that has at least as much good as bad news for the Chancellor. In late 2015 we updated trends from 2012 – and the attention-grabbing findings…
CONTINUE READING

On the money?

We’ve all had that moment – you look in your bank account and there isn’t nearly as much money in there as you thought, and pay day is still an alarming amount of time away. However, our research with King’s College London suggests that people’s misperceptions about their personal finances go way beyond the occasional…
CONTINUE READING

How deluded are you about your body?

The spring of 2015 saw middle class types up in (lycra-clad) arms over Protein World’s ‘Beach Body Ready’ campaign. The billboard advert featured a toned woman with a perceived air of smugness, as, in her bikini, she towered over the not-so-beach-ready passers-by. The term ‘beach body’ was seen by many as harmful, but the ASA…
CONTINUE READING

Cord-cutting and the future of TV

Think for a minute about how you watch programmes now and how that compares to how you watched five years ago? Different? For me, it’s not just the classier genre of show I’m watching (naturally!), I’m also discovering, viewing and sharing in a completely different way. Five years ago my viewing consisted of scheduled TV…
CONTINUE READING

A bed under the stairs: the housing crisis and generation strains

It is hard to ignore the increasing clamour to do something about housing. This year we recorded the highest level of national public concern about housing for 41 years,1https://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/3646/Level-of-concern-about-housing-is-highest-in-40-years-though-immigration-still-dominates.aspx and the National Housing Federation’s David Orr argues that, unless we build enough new homes and focus sufficiently on regeneration very quickly, “we will not be able…
CONTINUE READING

Immigration and the ballot box

Immigration was the issue that failed to bark in the general election campaign. But soon after, it rose to become THE most important issue facing the country in the eyes of the British public, with anxiety at record levels – partly propelled by the refugee crisis. We end the year with it playing a key…
CONTINUE READING

Technology in Advertising: Measuring Improvement

I know that half the money I spend on advertising is wasted, my only problem is that I don’t know which half”, is a quote that encapsulates two of the age old challenges in advertising: those of waste and proving effectiveness. It’s typically attributed to a US department store owner, John Wanamaker (1838-1922), though it’s…
CONTINUE READING

From the cradle to the boardroom – women and work

In 2015 one thing didn’t change – women continued to get a raw deal. The gender pay gap means that women were essentially working from 9 November until the end of the year for free, compared to their male counterparts.1http://www.fawcettsociety.org.uk/our-work/campaigns/equal-pay-day-2/ Though this day falls four days later than it did in 2014, indicating that the gender…
CONTINUE READING

The death of conventional banking

Last year, I wrote about the impact mobile payments would have in 2015. I am now travelling around London with only my mobile to pay for buses and tubes. After pension reform, we see advances in technology and internet/mobile banking as the consumer-led change that will have the largest impact on the banking industry over…
CONTINUE READING

The death of reason and the rise of intuition – who are the anti-vaxers?

In an age when public understanding of science has never been better, you would be forgiven for thinking that belief in supernatural beings and conspiracy theories had had their day. Public trust in science is steadily rising, as Ipsos’ regular study on science shows,1https://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/3357/Public-Attitudes-to-Science-2014.aspx and 90% of people are happy to place their faith in doctors.2https://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/3504/Politicians-trusted-less-than-estate-agents-bankers-and-journalists.aspx A…
CONTINUE READING

Why ad blocking could save the creative industry

Search the coverage of Apple’s latest software update and you’ll find a wealth of discussion about the inclusion of ad blocking capabilities. Needless to say, this has raised hackles across the creative and media industry. According to the direst forecasts advertisers will have to adapt or die. Not everyone is worried about ad blocking software…
CONTINUE READING

The view from here – global economic perspectives

This October, the International Monetary Fund published its latest review of the global economy, predicting a slowdown in growth this year to 3.1% (from 3.4% in 2014). In its understated way, the IMF noted that “prospects across the main countries and regions remain uneven”.1http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2015/02/index.html “Uneven” is a certainly a good descriptor of what we’ve witnessed…
CONTINUE READING

A nation of shopkeepers?

Britain’s retailers are in the midst of a revolution. Tesco made £1bn annual profit for the first time in 2001, rising every year until 2010. This year their profit collapsed and its market share fell to 28%. Grocery prices fell by 2.1% during 2015, as Lidl and Aldi continued to capture British wallets. Most of…
CONTINUE READING

How stable is the UK constitutional settlement?

The UK is currently in the unique situation of heading for a second major constitutional referendum in three years, with significant consequences for the make-up of the UK and its role in the world. Last year’s Scottish independence referendum has kept the UK intact, but the vote has still produced significant change. On top of the…
CONTINUE READING

The survey is dead, long live the survey

2015 has been an interesting year for pollsters. Whilst the general election exit poll once again proved to be remarkably accurate, the polls in the run up to election day were lacking in predictive power (even if Ipsos MORI’s were the best of a bad bunch!). Ben Page discusses this in more detail on page…
CONTINUE READING

Devolution revolution

After years of asking for more localism and devolution in England, local government got it in 2015. Giving control of business rates back to councils and the deals laying the foundations of the ‘Northern Powerhouse’ in Manchester (and 38 other ‘city regions’ or combined authority areas) are a major shift. However, they have a sting…
CONTINUE READING

We’re wrong about the norm – and it matters

While Jamie Oliver’s sugar tax campaign may not have had the start he wanted, having been rejected by the Prime Minister, it has served to highlight a worrying trend in British eating habits. About half of the population eat over the recommended daily amount of sugar.<fn>National Diet and Nutrition Survey: results from Years 1 to…
CONTINUE READING

The polls: getting it right (or not)

Ipsos MORI had a mixed election day. Our exit poll for the broadcasters (which we conducted in conjunction with GfK NOP and a team of academic political scientists who make the predictions from the data we collect) was a jaw-dropping success. Once again, almost nobody believed it. Paddy Ashdown, former Liberal Democrat leader, announced he…
CONTINUE READING

Foreword

Welcome to Ipsos MORI’s review of 2015 I’m writing this in the aftermath of the brutal and tragic Paris attacks, which served as a reminder that random terror is now a seemingly permanent fixture of the 21st century. In a world that is evermore prosperous, globalised and interlinked, inequality and religious divides seem as permanent…
CONTINUE READING