Yearly Archives: 2014

Foreword

Welcome to our 2014 Almanac. A year full of surprises. A surge in the public’s economic optimism this spring, but falling unemployment did not see a rise in personal financial optimism. Our politics is more uncertain than ever, a ‘war of the weak’: Labour’s post-referendum collapse in Scotland, the unpopularity of Ed Miliband, and their…
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Britain in 5D

Most Britons felt hopeful about this year, and our economic optimism reached record levels by the summer. However, the overall feel-good factor has remained elusive. In political terms, voters became more fractious than ever. Even as the recession slowly recedes, the public – and indeed Britain’s elites – are more and more concerned that multiple…
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How ignorant are we?

We know from our 2013 ‘Perils of Perception’ study that people in Britain are wildly wrong on many basic facts about our population and key social issues. The average person has a pretty poor understanding of things like what proportion of the population are immigrants or Muslims, what percentage of teenage girls get pregnant each…
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2014: The perils of prediction – politics and life on Mars

In January 2014, Labour were hoping to hang on to a nine point lead in the polls,1https://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/107/Voting-Intention-in-Great-Britain-Recent-Trends.aspx while the Conservatives hoped rising economic optimism 2https://www.ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/43/Economic-Optimism-Index-EOI-State-of-the-Economy-1997-Present.aspx could bring up their vote share. The Liberal Democrats were just hanging on to third place in the polls ahead of UKIP, who the public thought were as likely to win…
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The Great War – 100 years on

Among the most memorable visual images of 2014 was the sea of ceramic poppies in the moat of the Tower of London. The display, to mark Remembrance Day in this centenary year of the outbreak of World War One, drew millions of visitors, as well as calls for the installation to be extended or even…
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A bombshell in Scottish politics

Scottish politics feels a little like a parallel universe at the moment. Despite the ‘No’ campaign carrying the day in September’s independence vote by nearly 400,000 votes, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is enjoying a huge post-referendum dividend while Labour and the other unionist parties may suffer heavily in next year’s election. The referendum losers…
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Science: it’s more complicated than that

Science is continually the subject of controversy. In 2014 we have witnessed, among other things, faked stem cell research, hard-hitting UN reports on climate change, hotly disputed by a minority, and a devastating blow to the dream of commercial space travel. Despite this, science has been gaining in stature: the majority of British people view…
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Public Services – 2014 and beyond

Across the public sector there is some trepidation over the likely size of cuts after 2016 – whoever wins the election. So far, as we have reported every year since 2010, public services have coped relatively well with cuts. Satisfaction with most services, except road maintenance and social services, has been largely maintained or improved.…
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Data privacy – concern, confusion and apathy

Throughout 2014 the stream of stories about hacked, leaked or scraped personal details from the military, business and celebrities was almost daily. But how do the public now view data protection and privacy? Are there any signs that people’s concerns are changing how they behave, particularly online? What are the consistent themes that emerge from…
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We’re all biased now: behaviour change in 2014

The excitement of the World Cup this year had people irrationally hoping that a small, underperforming nation would surprise the world and receive the footballing crown. It’s the kind of logical fallacy to which every football fan falls victim, and it is one of the rules of the beautiful game that means we keep supporting…
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Where are all the shoppers going?

Until recently, Tesco was the bellwether of the UK grocery industry, helped by a sophisticated loyalty and customer segmentation programme powered by Dunnhumby. Ironically today, in the era of the ‘Big Data revolution’, the use of data and science to drive customer loyalty was clearly not enough – or wasn’t used effectively. What Tesco (along…
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Making real time the right time

2014 was the year when smartphone ownership hit the magic number – 60%. Users spend, on average, three hours a day looking at their phones, and for all businesses and public services, that screen is the place you need to be. Immediate access to content is expected at any time of the day or night.…
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An emotional year in adland

One of the long-term structural changes in economics, communications, psychology and research has been an increased understanding of the importance of ‘emotion’ and instinctive unconscious decision-making. In advertising it is all-conquering. It also has multiple meanings and definitions. Do we mean System 1 or System 2, engagement, salience, resonance, physiological reactions, emotional priming or emotional…
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Your phone and your money

Our phones have become a device we are inseparable from, and 2015 may be the year they take the role of banker for millions. 2014 saw two developments which could finally take mobile payments to the broader public – Paym and Apple Pay. The majority of us have now been willingly or unwillingly co-opted into…
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Has mobile killed the radio star?

The decline of radio listening has been predicted for decades. The arrival of television, games consoles, CDs, personal stereos, music television, iTunes, iPod, Pandora and Spotify cover several generations of threat. Today, ‘Is mobile killing radio?’ adds another headline-grabbing threat. Is it finally true?   Certainly, the younger generation love their smartphones. Today, around nine…
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The death of TV? Video anytime

The number of British adults streaming TV programmes or movies reached record highs in 2014, fuelled by enhanced connectivity, technological innovation and increased affordability. Tablets and smartphones have become increasingly commonplace, giving content whenever and wherever we like. A whole generation of children in this country has grown up with no comprehension of video being…
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Emerging techniques – a research renaissance

Our business of researching people’s attitudes and behaviours is changing. We have witnessed a revolution in consumer behaviour driven by our changing relationship with technology. Today, three-quarters of us say we couldn’t imagine life without the internet and the three in five of us who now own a smartphone would rather give up any other…
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Why did I buy that from there?

Have you ever asked yourself the question ‘why did I buy that from there?’ Grocery shopping habits have changed dramatically in the past years and not just because of the introduction of online shopping and the ability to buy from multiple places with various electronic devices. The types of shops we use reflect our changing…
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2014 Favourite facts

References 1. One in four agree that the role of women in society is to be good mothers and wives. The survey was conducted in 20 countries via the Ipsos Online Panel with a total sample of 16,039 adults aged 18-64 in the US and Canada, and age 16-64 in all other countries. Approximately 1000+…
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Infographics 2014

Public Attitudes to Science Maintaining pride in the NHS Ipsos MORI Scottish Referendum infographic Britain: A paler shade of green Ipsos MORI Perils of Perception Joseph Roundtree Foundation animationPoverty in the…
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